Dabo Swinney

Coach Dabo Swinney

An illustrious coaching heritage is embedded in the foundation of Clemson football. At the dawn of the 20th century, the Tigers were led by future College Football Hall of Famer John Heisman. Hall of Famers Jess Neely, Frank Howard and Danny Ford followed in Heisman’s winning tradition.

In only 11 seasons at Clemson (10 full seasons), Dabo Swinney has carved his name into that foundation, elevating himself amid a pantheon of Clemson greats by becoming the first coach in program history to lead Clemson to multiple national championships.

Swinney and Clemson’s 2018 season was one for which statistics and superlatives accumulated in historic fashion. The Tigers became the first major college football team in the modern era (and the first since the Penn Quakers in 1897) to finish a season 15-0.

The list of “firsts” was long and distinguished. Clemson became the first ACC program to beat Florida State in four consecutive years, handing the Seminoles their worst home loss in school history. It became the first program to win four consecutive Atlantic Division titles. And with a 42-10 win against Pitt in the ACC Championship Game, the Tigers became the first program to win four consecutive ACC titles outright.

Clemson’s 15 wins included a school-record 12 against teams who finished with winning records. Clemson won by an average margin of 31.1 points per game, the best in the nation and the second-largest in school history, trailing only a 35.3-point average margin in 1900. Among the seasons it passed was a 30.4-point average margin in 1901, a season in which Clemson won one of its five games by a score of 122-0.

Clemson set school records in points (664) and total offense (7,718, also an ACC record). Conversely, the defense held opponents to 13.1 points per game, leading the country in scoring defense for the first time in school history.

A critical point in the season came four games into the campaign. Following a 49-21 win at Georgia Tech in which true freshman quarterback Trevor Lawrence threw for four touchdowns in reserve, Swinney and the coaching staff elected to name Lawrence the starter, supplanting senior Kelly Bryant, who had led the Tigers to a 16-2 career record as a starter.

With Lawrence leading Swinney’s Tigers, Clemson took flight. After a dramatic come-from-behind 27-23 win against Syracuse after Lawrence exited the game with an injury, Clemson rattled off 10 consecutive wins of 20 points or more to conclude the season, including blowout wins of No. 3 Notre Dame in the Cotton Bowl and No. 1 Alabama in the College Football Playoff National Championship.

Seven players earned first- or second-team All-America honors, including a school-record three players who collected consensus honors. The 2018 Tigers produced a team-record 18 All-ACC selections and became the first team to produce the ACC Player of the Year, ACC Offensive Player of the Year, ACC Defensive Player of the Year, ACC Offensive Rookie of the Year and ACC Coach of the Year in a single season since Florida State in 1997.

Accolades also accumulated for Swinney, who earned his second career ACC Coach of the Year selection and brought home the Woody Hayes Award as national coach of the year. Less than a week after winning the national title, he also won the Paul “Bear” Bryant Award, becoming the first three-time winner in the award’s history. With the 2018 Bryant and Hayes Awards, Swinney has now won national coach of the year honors from at least one organization in five of the last seven years.

The 2018 season was preceded by a 2017 campaign in which Clemson was on a mission to prove that it was built to last. Swinney guided the team to a 12-2 record, an ACC title and a College Football Playoff berth despite having only six scholarship seniors and losing players who accounted for 77 percent of the offense during the 2016 national championship season.

While Clemson was ranked No. 5 in the preseason AP poll, few expected the Tigers to be ranked No. 1 in both polls and the College Football Playoff ranking entering the bowl season. In fact, Clemson was not even the preseason choice to win the ACC Atlantic Division.

Despite a setback in the Sugar Bowl to the eventual national champion, Alabama, Clemson finished ranked No. 4 in both polls. Swinney joined Bobby Bowden as the only ACC head coaches to lead a program to a final top-five ranking three straight years, a streak he pushed to four in 2018. He was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame following the season.

Clemson’s school-record six wins over top-25 teams in 2017, also a national best, included a school-record four on opponents’ home fields and five away from home. The defense, including three defensive linemen, featured four players who were named All-American, helping Clemson rank in the top four in the nation in scoring defense (No. 2) and total defense (No. 4). Clemson led the ACC in the four major defensive categories (scoring, total, rushing, passing), a first in program history.

The 2016 Tigers lived up to their hype after compiling a 14-1 record and earning a spot in the College Football Playoff for the second-straight year. Along the way, Clemson knocked off five top-25 foes.

Clemson defeated the top two teams in the national polls in consecutive games in the College Football Playoff at the end of the season. The Tigers blanked Ohio State, 31-0, in the Fiesta Bowl, the first shutout suffered by head coach Urban Meyer in his career and the first for Ohio State since 1993. The Tigers then earned a rematch with No. 1 Alabama, and for the first time in school history, took down the top-ranked team in a second epic battle with the storied Crimson Tide program. Quarterback Deshaun Watson’s touchdown pass to Hunter Renfrow with one second left on the clock gave Clemson a dramatic 35-31 victory in Tampa, Fla. Swinney received the Bear Bryant Award as national coach-of-the-year for the second consecutive season.

Swinney coached Watson to two record-setting seasons in 2015 and 2016. The two-time Heisman Trophy finalist became the first player in FBS history to total 4,000 passing yards and 1,000 rushing yards in a season in 2015, and he followed by setting an ACC record with 41 passing touchdowns in 2016. Watson won the Davey O’Brien Award and Manning Award in back-to-back seasons.

From 2011-18, Clemson compiled an 97-15 record, the most wins in an eight-year period in school history. Clemson enters the final year of the decade having won 103 games in the 2010s, marking the first 100-win decade in Clemson history.

Clemson was in the top 10 of APR scores and the final top 25 of the AP and USA Today polls from 2011-15, the only FBS program that could make that claim. In 2017, Clemson became the first school to reach the College Football Playoff and finish in the top five of APR scores in the same year. Clemson is one of only three programs to earn Top 10 percent APR recognition from the NCAA in at least eight of the last nine years. In 2018, Clemson produced the Campbell Trophy winner (known colloquially as the “Academic Heisman”) in Christian Wilkins and won the program’s first AFCA Academic Achievement Award.

In 11 years (10 full seasons) as the Tigers’ head coach, Swinney has directed Clemson to a 116-30 overall record (.795, best by a Tiger coach with at least 25 games coached) and 69-16 ACC regular-season mark (.812). He has also led the Tigers to the ACC Championship Game six times, won five ACC titles, won or shared seven ACC Atlantic Division titles and won nine bowl games (seven against top-10 teams). His teams have compiled 30 wins over ranked teams in his head-coaching career, including 15 over top-10 opponents.

Swinney guided Clemson to the No. 1 national ranking in every College Football Playoff poll in 2015 and led the Tigers to their first national championship game appearance under the new format after his team defeated Oklahoma, 37-17, in the 2015 Orange Bowl. The Tigers led Alabama in the fourth quarter of the championship contest, but came up just short (45-40) in an epic game in Glendale, Ariz.

Following the team’s 14-1 record and No. 2 final ranking, he was the recipient of 10 national and two ACC coach-of-the-year honors.

In 2015, a then-Tiger-record 17 players were named to one of three All-ACC teams, including all five starting offensive linemen for the first time in school history. In 2016, 15 players were honored, including a school-record three first-team All-ACC offensive line selections.

The 2012, 2013 and 2014 seasons were also noteworthy, with three top-15 final rankings. Each of Clemson’s teams from 2011-18 registered double-digit wins, the first time the program did it eight straight seasons. Only Alabama has duplicated the feat.

With a 2014 Russell Athletic Bowl victory (40-6) over Oklahoma, Swinney became the first and only coach in history to win three bowl games in consecutive seasons over teams whose head coaches had previously won the national title. He upped that mark to five years in a row in 2016.

Clemson capped off the 2013 season with a thrilling 40-35 victory over No. 6 Ohio State in the Orange Bowl. Clemson had an 11-2 record after finishing 7-1 in ACC regular-season games. It marked Clemson’s first back-to-back 11-win seasons in school history. For the fourth time in his first five full seasons as head coach, Swinney was a finalist for the Liberty Mutual National Coach of the Year in 2013.

The 2012 season (11-2) was a groundbreaking year for Swinney’s Tigers when looking at the overall consistency of the program. The seven conference wins in the regular season were then a school record, while Clemson was co-champion of the ACC Atlantic Division.

With Clemson’s thrilling 25-24 win over No. 7 LSU in the 2012 Chick-fil-A Bowl, the Tigers finished the season ranked No. 9 in the USA Today poll. It was Clemson’s first top-10 finish in one of the two major polls since 1990. Clemson also reached the 11-win mark for the first time since its 1981 national championship season.

Swinney’s 2011 squad, which ended the season ranked No. 22 in the nation, captured Clemson’s first ACC title since 1991 when it beat No. 3 Virginia Tech, 38-10, in the ACC Championship Game in Charlotte, N.C. It gave Clemson its first 10-win season since 1990. For his efforts, Swinney was named Bobby Dodd National Coach of the Year in 2011 to become the first Tiger head coach to win a national coach-of-the-year award since Ford in 1981.

Swinney became just the second Tiger coach to lead Clemson to a bowl game in his first two full years as head coach, joining his predecessor, Tommy Bowden. The 2010 schedule was one of the most challenging in school history, as nine bowl teams were on the regular-season slate and two of the four non-conference opponents were ranked in the top 25.

In 2009, Swinney’s first full year as head coach, he led the Tigers to their first championship of the ACC Atlantic Division. The Tigers came just six points short of winning their first ACC title in 18 years. Swinney was named ACC Coach of the Year by Sporting News and was a finalist for the Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year.

In October 2008, Swinney was named Clemson’s interim head coach, replacing Bowden, who had been his position coach as a player at Alabama and was Clemson’s head coach since 1999. He led the Tigers to a 4-2 record during the remainder of the 2008 regular season, including a win over South Carolina in the regular-season finale to earn a Gator Bowl bid against Nebraska.

On Dec. 1, 2008, Swinney’s interim tag was removed and he was named the program’s head coach. At the time, there had been 28 interim head coaches at the FBS level since 1970, and those coaches had combined for a record of 26-86-2. Only one of those 28 interim coaches posted a winning record, and that was Swinney. When he was hired as head coach, he became just the second interim coach to be elevated to the head coach position at the same school during that time period.

Swinney hit the ground running in his first week as interim head coach, as he prepared for a 5-1 Georgia Tech team. He had to reorganize his staff and regroup his team and the fanbase in just five days. While the Tigers lost by four points, he accomplished many goals in that first week through his outstanding leadership. One of the most impressive demonstrations of unity came during the team’s “Tiger Walk.”

Swinney has demonstrated his community involvement through Dabo’s All In Team Foundation, which made the first contribution to the cancer fund established for former Boston College linebacker Mark Herzlich. Many schools followed his lead during the remainder of the season.

The 1993 Alabama graduate joined the Clemson staff prior to the 2003 season. In his first 16 years as an assistant or head coach, the Tigers finished in the top 25 of the polls 12 times and totaled 37 wins over top-25 teams.

Swinney coached his wide receiver position to a level of consistency that had not been seen previously at Clemson. He had a wideout finish first or second in the ACC in catches in five of his six years as an assistant coach. In his first year, he had three of the top-10 receivers in the ACC, a first in Tiger history. He has coached a first- or second-team All-ACC wideout (Derrick Hamilton, Airese Currie, Chansi Stuckey, Aaron Kelly, Jacoby Ford, Sammy Watkins, DeAndre Hopkins, Artavis Scott, Mike Williams, Tee Higgins) in 14 of his 16 seasons in Tigertown, also unprecedented at Clemson.

The Alabama native has a reputation as one of the top recruiters in the nation. In 2006, he was listed as the No. 5 recruiter in the nation by Rivals. He signed 38 players in his five recruiting seasons as an assistant coach and was a major reason Clemson’s 2008 recruiting class was rated No. 2 in the nation by ESPN when he signed 11 players.

When Swinney accepted the interim head coaching position at Clemson on Oct. 13, 2008, he described his feelings as “bittersweet,” because he was taking over for Bowden, who had been his first position coach at Alabama in the 1989 season. He had also brought Swinney back to the coaching profession in 2003 and has had a profound effect on his life. Both had followed similar paths as players, as Bowden was a walk-on at West Virginia and Swinney was a walk-on at Alabama.

Swinney received a commerce & business administration degree from Alabama in 1993 after lettering three times (1990-92). A walk-on who went on to earn a scholarship, Swinney was a wide receiver on Alabama’s 1992 national championship team. He was also named Academic All-SEC along with being an SEC Scholar-Athlete Honor Roll member in 1990 and 1992.

Along with his appearance in the 1993 Sugar Bowl, his Alabama teams played in the 1990 Sugar Bowl, 1991 Fiesta Bowl and 1991 Blockbuster Bowl. Both Sugar Bowl appearances came after winning the SEC title game.

After his playing career, Swinney served as a graduate assistant at Alabama from 1993-95. In December 1995, he received a master’s degree in business administration from Alabama.

He became a full-time assistant coach at Alabama in February 1996 under head coach Gene Stallings and coached a total of five seasons there on a full-time basis. Swinney was assigned to coach the Crimson Tide’s wide receivers and tight ends in 1996, a season that saw Alabama win the SEC West Division title. The following year, he solely coached the tight ends.

In 1998, he coached Alabama’s wide receivers, a position he held for three seasons. At the end of the 1999 campaign, Swinney coached the Crimson Tide in the 2000 Orange Bowl after winning the SEC Championship Game.

During his time at Alabama, Swinney was a part of six teams with double-digit wins, five top-10 finishes, one national title (1992), three SEC championships (1989,92,99) and five SEC West Division titles (1992,93,94,96,99) as a player and coach.

Swinney married the former Kathleen Bassett in 1994. They have three sons, Will (21 in August), Drew (19) and Clay (16 in July). Will, a junior, and Drew, a redshirt freshman, are both on the 2019 Tiger football team.

 

Tony Elliott

CO-OFFENSIVE COORDINATOR/RUNNING BACKS

  • Clemson’s run of eight straight 10-win seasons started when he became a full-time assistant coach. Clemson is 97-15 since he came back to Clemson in 2011.
  • Had a big impact in Clemson winning five ACC titles. He has been on the staff of seven ACC Atlantic Division titles in the last eight years.
  • Recipient of the 2017 Frank Broyles Award as the nation’s top assistant coach.
  • Running backs coach of the year by FootballScoop in 2017.\
  • Helped Clemson produce a school-record 3,723 rushing yards in 2018, breaking the record of 3,469 that had stood since 1978. Also broke the school records in yards per carry (6.55) and rushing touchdowns (49).
  • Guided Travis Etienne to one of the finest rushing seasons in Clemson’s illustrious history in 2018, helping the ACC Player of the Year and Doak Walker Award finalist set school records in rushing yards (1,658) and rushing touchdowns (24).
  • Co-offensive coordinator of Clemson’s 2016 and 2018 national championship teams.
  • Named one of the top-25 recruiters in the nation in 2015 and one of the top-10 recruiters in the ACC by Rivals.
  • He was named co-offensive coordinator prior to the 2014 Russell Athletic Bowl. The Tigers have a 56-4 record in 60 games since he became co-offensive coordinator.
  • Coached a 1,000-yard rusher six times, including Wayne Gallman in 2015 and 2016 and Etienne in 2018.
  • Coached All-ACC running back Roderick McDowell in 2013. He had 1,025 rushing yards and 29 receptions.
  • Coached first-team All-ACC running back Andre Ellington in 2012. Ellington was just the third running back in school history with two 1,000-yard rushing seasons.
  • Played on and coached Clemson teams that have been in the final AP top 25. He played on the 2003 team that finished No. 23 and coached running backs in 2011, when the Tigers finished No. 22. Clemson has finished in the top-25 in each of the first eight years he has been a full-time coach.
  • Spent three years (2008-10) as wide receivers coach at Furman and two seasons (2006,07) at SC State.
  • In 2008, he coached All-SoCon performer Adam Mims, who had a team-high 58 receptions, and David Hendrix, who set a freshman record with 46 receptions. Mims continued to flourish under Elliott’s guidance and ended his career with 198 catches for 2,433 yards.
  • Returned to coaching in 2006 as an assistant coach at SC State. That team was 23rd nationally in total offense.
  • Entered the business world after his playing days were over at Clemson and worked with Michelin North America for two years.
  • Earned an undergraduate degree in industrial engineering in 2002, was a First-Team Academic All-ACC selection and a CoSIDA Academic District III member.
  • Was a co-captain of Clemson’s 2003 team that had a 9-4 record and a No. 22 final ranking by AP and USA Today. He had 23 receptions for 286 yards and a touchdown that season. He was also a recipient of a ACC’s Weaver-James-Corrigan Postgraduate Scholarship.
  • Dabo Swinney was his position coach during his senior season (2003). That year in a survey of Clemson players conducted by Anderson Independent, he was named the team’s “most respected player.”
  • Had 34 receptions for 455 yards and two touchdowns in his career. He came to Clemson as a walk-on in the fall of 1999 and finished his career with four letters and 44 games, including four as a starter as a senior (2003). He had a touchdown catch at Georgia Tech that year.

“Tony is one of the smartest coaches I have ever worked with. He brings a sense of calmness to the staff. And even as a young guy, he is very, very wise beyond his years.”

Dabo Swinney

Jeff Scott

CO-OFFENSIVE COORDINATOR/WIDE RECEIVERS

  • Clemson has been to a bowl game each of his 11 years as a full-time assistant coach, including three national championship berths and two national titles.
  • Had a big impact in Clemson winning five ACC titles. He has been on the staff of seven ACC Atlantic Division titles in the last 10 years.
  • Was a finalist for the 2018 Broyles Award as one of the top assistant coaches in the nation.
  • Named one of the top-25 recruiters in the nation by Rivals and as ACC Recruiter of the Year by 247Sports in 2018.
  • Helped Hunter Renfrow earn the 2018 Burlsworth Trophy, presented annually to the most outstanding player who started his career as a walk-on.
  • His receivers helped Clemson produce the fifth 4,000-yard passing season in school history in 2018. The 2018 season joined the 2015 campaign as the only seasons in school history featuring both 4,000 passing yards and 3,000 rushing yards.
  • Shattered the school record for total touchdowns in 2018, scoring 90 to break the previous mark of 75 set by the 2016 team.
  • Coached the 2016 team to record-setting passing yards (5,009) and touchdowns (45), while averaging 503.5 yards per game.
  • Coached first-team All-ACC wide receiver Mike Williams in 2016. Williams recorded his second 1,000-yard season and a team-leading 11 touchdowns, and was a second-team Walter Camp All-American as well.
  • Coached wide receiver Artavis Scott to three All-ACC seasons (2014-16). Scott broke Sammy Watkins’ school record with 245 career receptions.
  • Named one of the top-25 recruiters in the nation and ACC Recruiter of the Year in 2015 by Rivals.
  • Named co-offensive coordinator prior to the 2014 Russell Athletic Bowl.
  • Named one of the top-10 recruiters in the nation by ESPN in 2014, one of the top-14 recruiters in the country by NFL.com in 2014 and one of the top-25 recruiters by Rivals.com in 2012 and 2014.
  • Coached first-team All-ACC and first-team All-America wide receiver Sammy Watkins in 2013. He had a school-record 101 receptions for a school-record 1,464 yards and 12 touchdowns. He also set or tied school career records for receptions (240), receiving yards (3,391) and receiving touchdowns (27).
  • In 2012, he coached first-round draft pick DeAndre Hopkins to a second-team All-America season. Hopkins had 82 receptions for 1,405 yards and an ACC-record 18 touchdowns, second-most in the nation.
  • In 2011, he coached one of the top receiving duos in school history in Watkins and Hopkins. Watkins, the national freshman of the year and a first-team All-American, had 82 receptions for 1,219 yards and 12 touchdowns. Hopkins had 72 receptions for 978 yards, adding five touchdowns.
  • Helped the Tigers to a top-25 ranking and the ACC Atlantic Division title in his first full season as an assistant coach in 2009.
  • Took over as Clemson’s recruiting coordinator in December 2008 and the Tigers put together a top-10 signing class in his first season (2009) at the position. Then in both 2011 and 2012, Clemson had top-10 recruiting classes.
  • Son of former Tiger associate head coach Brad Scott (1999-10), and was thus part of the first full-time, father-son coaching combination in Clemson football history. Brad is an associate athletic director and is still a member of Clemson’s staff since retiring from coaching.
  • A member of three bowl teams as a player at Clemson during the 2000-02 seasons. He played in the 2001 Gator Bowl, 2001 Humanitarian Bowl and 2002 Tangerine Bowl.
  • Had his first full-time college job at Presbyterian College in 2007 as wide receivers coach, then came to Clemson as a graduate assistant in 2008. He moved into full-time status when Tommy Bowden resigned at midseason.
  • Began his coaching career at Blythewood (S.C.) High and won a state title in his first year and the program’s first year. It is believed to be the first time that occurred in South Carolina high school football history.

“Jeff is passionate about being the best at what he does. He is passionate and very detailed and loves Clemson.”

Dabo Swinney

Robbie Caldwell

OFFENSIVE LINE

  • Has a staff-high 41 years of experience in college coaching and a staff-high 492 college games as a coach.
  • Clemson has a 97-15 record, eight 10+ win seasons and eight top-25 final rankings in his first eight years on staff, as well as five ACC titles, three appearances in the national championship game and national titles in 2016 and 2018.
  • Helped Clemson produce a school-record 3,723 rushing yards in 2018, breaking the record of 3,469 that had stood since 1978. Also broke the school records in yards per carry (6.55) and rushing touchdowns (49).
  • His line allowed only 17 sacks in 15 games in 2018, including only five in the season’s final eight games.
  • Coached tackle Mitch Hyatt to consensus All-American status and his second consecutive Jacobs Blocking Trophy in 2018 and guided all five of his starting linemen from the season opener to All-ACC honors.
  • Placed three offensive linemen (Tyrone Crowder, Justin Falcinelli and Hyatt) on the first-team All-ACC squad in 2017.
  • Coached three first-team All-ACC offensive linemen (Crowder, Jay Guillermo, Hyatt) in 2016, a first in Tiger history.
  • Coached five All-ACC selections in 2015, Clemson’s entire starting five, for the first time in school history.
  • Coached tackle Brandon Thomas, a third-round draft pick, to his second-straight All-ACC selection in 2013. Guard Tyler Shatley also earned All-ACC honors that season.
  • In 2012, he coached first-team All-American Dalton Freeman and Thomas, a first-team All-ACC pick. Freeman was a Rimington Trophy finalist for the second year in a row.
  • In 2011, Freeman was a Rimington Trophy finalist and a first-team All-ACC selection.
  • Served as Vanderbilt’s head coach in 2010 after eight years as offensive line coach at Vanderbilt. He was a part of the 2008 Vanderbilt staff that guided it to its first winning season and bowl win since 1955.
  • Joined Clemson graduate Bobby Johnson’s staff at Vanderbilt in 2002.
  • Coached at North Carolina in 2000 and 2001.
  • Moved with Dick Sheridan to NC State in 1986. He was part of a Wolfpack resurgence, as he helped turn a 3-8 team (1985) into an 8-3-1 club that beat three AP top-25 teams in 1986. He was on the NC State staff when it beat Clemson three straight years (1986-88).
  • Coached the Wolfpack offensive line for 11 years, then added assistant head coaching responsibilities in his last three years. Fourteen of his players were All-ACC picks.
    • Served under Sheridan for eight years and Furman won six league titles during that era. He coached eight first-team all-conference players and five recipients of the SoCon’s Jacobs Blocking Trophy. In 2019, he was inducted into the Furman Athletic Hall of Fame for his contributions to the program as a player and as a coach.
  • He started his coaching career as a student assistant coach at Furman under Art Baker in 1976 and became a full-time offensive line coach with the Paladins under Sheridan in 1978. In 1977, he served as the football and baseball coach at Hanahan (S.C.) High School.

“Robbie is salty. He’s old school, hardnosed and tough. He is the epitome an offensive line coach.”

Dabo Swinney

Danny Pearman

ASSOCIATE HEAD COACH/TIGHT ENDS/SPECIAL TEAMS COORDINATOR

  • Coached in a national championship game with three different schools, including Clemson (2015,16,18).
  • Had a big impact in Clemson winning five ACC titles. He has been on the staff of seven ACC Atlantic Division titles in the last 10 years.
  • Led tight end group that helped Clemson eclipsed3,500 rushing yards in a season for the first time with a school-record 3,723 yards, breaking a mark that had stood since 1978.
  • His tight ends helped Clemson average 194.1 rushing yards per game in 2017.
  • Won his second and third national championships as an assistant coach in 2016 and 2018, as he was an assistant at Alabama in 1992.
  • Coached two-time All-American and two-time Mackey Award finalist Jordan Leggett. Leggett set Clemson tight end records for receptions, yards, and touchdowns.
  • Placekicker Greg Huegel was an All-American in 2015.
  • Coached Bradley Pinion, who averaged 42.6 yards per punt with 28 punts inside the 20 against only two touchbacks. Pinion was selected in the fifth round of the 2015 NFL draft and is now the starter for the San Francisco 49ers.
  • Has coached the Tiger special teams since 2011, including current NFL kicker Chandler Catanzaro, who was a three-time All-ACC placekicker. Catanzaro is Clemson’s career scoring leader (404) and made 81.7 percent of his field goals.
  • Coached Brandon Ford to a First-Team All-ACC season at tight end in 2012.
  • Coached Dwayne Allen, now a Super Bowl champion with the New England Patriots, in the 2011 season, when Allen won the Mackey Award and was a first-team All-American.
  • In 2010, he coached offensive tackle Chris Hairston to a first-team All-ACC season and Allen to second-team All-ACC honors. Hairston played seven NFL seasons.
  • In 2009, his tight ends had 54 catches, most for the position in Tiger history at the time. He coached first-team All-ACC tight end Michael Palmer and Hairston, a second-team All-ACC selection.
  • Joined the staff in December 2008 and coached in the 2009 Gator Bowl. He joined a small group of people who have played for Clemson in a bowl game and later coached the Tigers in a bowl game.
  • Played tight end on Clemson’s 1986 and 1987 ACC title teams, then served as a graduate assistant on the Tigers’ 1988 ACC Championship team.
  • In 28 years as a full-time Division I coach, his teams have played 28 bowl games. Including three years as a graduate assistant coach, it is 31 bowl games in 31 seasons.
  • In his second year at Alabama, he directed the offensive tackles and served as special teams coordinator on its 1992 national title team.
  • Alabama made six bowl appearances in his eight years. Alabama won the SEC West Division five times.
  • Served on the same Alabama staff with current Clemson head coach Dabo Swinney from 1993-97.
  • After eight years at Alabama, he moved to Virginia Tech, where he worked eight years under Frank Beamer.
  • Virginia Tech played Florida State for the national championship in the Sugar Bowl in 1999.
  • Coached tight ends at Virginia Tech and was also a special teams assistant.
  • Coached at North Carolina in 2006, Duke in 2007 and Maryland in 2008. He helped Maryland to the Humanitarian Bowl in 2008, before leaving to coach in the Gator Bowl vs. Nebraska for the Tigers that season.

“Danny is a no-nonsense kind of guy, and that makes him an outstanding teacher. There is no one better to teach the technique of being a football player.”

Dabo Swinney

Brandon Streeter

QUARTERBACKS/RECRUITING COORDINATOR

  • Entering 12th full season at Clemson overall, including his playing career and tenures as a graduate assistant and full-time assistant coach.
  • Returned to Clemson as the recruiting coordinator and quarterbacks coach in December 2014.
  • In his four full seasons, has helped Clemson to four straight ACC titles, four straight CFP berths, three national champion berths and two national titles.
  • As recruiting coordinator, he spearheaded Clemson’s top-10 classes according to Rivals in four of the last five years.
  • In 2018, helped true freshman Trevor Lawrence become the first true freshman starting quarterback to win a national title since Oklahoma’s Jamelle Holieway in 1985. Lawrence was a second-team All-ACC honoree and freshman All-American in addition to being a Maxwell Award finalist and Davey O’Brien Award semifinalist. He also won ACC Offensive Rookie of the Year.
  • Helped Lawrence win the Archie Griffin Award in 2018 as the nation’s most valuable player after he set school freshman records in passing yards, passing touchdowns and wins as a starting quarterback in addition to the school record for consecutive pass attempts without an interception (169).
  • Coached Manning Award finalist and Davey O’Brien Award semifinalist Kelly Bryant in 2017. Earned Quarterbacks Coach of the Year from 247Sports.
  • Coached Clemson’s first two-time Heisman Trophy finalist, Deshaun Watson. He became the first player in FBS history with at least 4,000 passing yards and 1,000 rushing yards in a season in 2015.
  • Watson was a two-time recipient of the Davey O’Brien and Manning awards, given to the nation’s top quarterback. He also won the 2016 Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award and 2016 Bobby Bowden Award.
  • Coached the 2015 Tigers to 11 consecutive games with at least 500 yards of total offense, a school record.
  • Six of the seven teams he worked with as an offensive coordinator between the 2008-14 seasons finished the year in the top 25 of the FCS poll. That included the 2014 Richmond team that entered the FCS playoffs ranked No. 16 in the nation. Five of the last eight teams were conference champions or co-champions, and Clemson has finished in the top two in each of his three seasons.
  • Helped the 2014 Richmond team to a 9-5 record and a bid to the FCS playoffs, as the Spiders reached the second round.
  • Guided Richmond to a top-20 finish in passing offense each season from 2012-14. That included a 314-yard average, eighth-best in the nation, in 2014. The Spiders also averaged 461 yards per game, 19th-most in the nation, and were second in third-down conversion percentage (51.6) and third in first downs (332).
  • Richmond was seventh in the nation in passing yards (328) in 2013. Virtually every Richmond individual game, season and career school passing record was established during the 2013 season. The 2012 Richmond offense was 20th in passing offense and 21st in scoring offense. The Spider offense saw five players earn All-CAA recognition.
  • Streeter served as quarterbacks coach at Liberty for six years, the last three as offensive coordinator. In 2011, Liberty led the Big South Conference in passing yards and pass efficiency.
  • In 2010, Liberty averaged 36.5 points per game, a better mark than in 2009, when the Flames led the nation in scoring offense (36.4). That Liberty team won the Big South Conference title for a fourth straight year.
  • He served as a graduate assistant at Clemson in 2004 and 2005, when Dabo Swinney was an assistant coach. Streeter worked with quarterback Charlie Whitehurst, third on Clemson’s career passing yards chart, during those two seasons.
  • Three-time letterman at Clemson from 1997-99. He was Clemson’s starting quarterback the last two years. He was also a three-time member of the ACC Academic Honor Roll.

“Brandon has done a tremendous job of coaching our quarterbacks.  He is a detail oriented coach that demands excellence from his players and does a great job teaching them the game.”

Dabo Swinney

Brent Venables

Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers

  • In his 23 years as a full-time assistant coach, his teams have 23 winning seasons, have been to 27 bowl games and have won 10+ games 19 times.
  • Has coached in six national championship games, helping Clemson to three berths and two titles.
  • Ranked fourth in rushing defense (96.3 yards per game), fifth in total defense (285.9 yards per game) in 2018. Led the country in scoring defense (13.1 points per game) for the first time in school history.
  • Unit set a school record with 54 sacks in 2018, the third-most by any FBS team in a season since 2000.
  • His 2018 defense produced five first- or second-team All-Americans, including two consensus selections (Clelin Ferrell and Christian Wilkins). Ferrell also won the Ted Hendricks Award as the nation’s top defensive end and Wilkins won the Campbell Trophy, known colloquially as the “Academic Heisman.” Linebacker Tre Lamar was a finalist for the Butkus Award.
  • His 2017 defense was second in the nation in scoring defense (13.6) and fourth in total defense (276.7).
  • Helped linebacker Dorian O’Daniel become a finalist for the Butkus Award in 2017.
  • Recipient of the 2016 Frank Broyles Award as the nation’s top assistant coach. His 2016 group amassed
  • 130 tackles for loss and a then-school-record 49 sacks. His teams led the NCAA in tackles for loss four seasons in a row from 2013-16.
  • Ben Boulware was a first-team All-ACC performer and second-team Walter Camp All-American in 2016, as well as ACC Co-Defensive Player of the Year.
  • Named one of the top-10 recruiters in the ACC in 2015 by Rivals. Was national defensive coordinator of the year by FootballScoop in 2014 and national recruiter of the year by Rivals in 2015.
  • Finalist for the 2015 Broyles Award after his defense was fourth nationally in third-down conversion percentage (27.7) and in sacks per game (3.2) and fifth in tackles for loss per game (8.4).
  • His 2014 defense led the nation in total defense (260.8), pass efficiency defense (98.3), first downs allowed (185), third-down conversion percentage defense (27.4) and tackles for loss (131).
  • His 2013 unit led the nation in tackles for loss (122).
  • Named one of the top-25 recruiters in the nation in 2013 by Rivals and one of the top-50 recruiters in the nation in 2013 by 247Sports.
  • His 2012 defense held opponents to just 34.0 percent on third down, 24th-best in the nation.
  • Coached 13 years (1999-11) at Oklahoma and three years (1996-98) at Kansas State. Was also a graduate assistant coach at Kansas State for three years (1993-95).
  • Served as co-defensive coordinator (1999-03) and defensive coordinator at Oklahoma (2004-11).
  • Linebackers under his direction were named Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year five times and Big 12
  • Defensive Newcomer of the Year five times. Has coached two Butkus Award winners and four other
  • Butkus Award finalists, including O’Daniel and Lamar.
  • Broyles Award finalist in the 2006 season when Oklahoma led the Big 12 in total defense and scoring defense.
  • Oklahoma ranked first in the nation in total defense, first in passing defense, second in pass efficiency defense, third in scoring defense and fifth in turnover margin in 2003.
  • His 2001 defense was fourth in the nation in scoring defense, fourth in total defense, fifth in pass effiency defense and seventh in rushing defense.
  • Also owns a national championship ring as co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach at Oklahoma in 2000.
  • As a player at Kansas State, he was Honorable Mention All-Big Eight in 1992 with 124 tackles. He was also an All-American at Garden City (Kan.) Community College who recorded 276 career tackles.

“Brent is intense, passionate, and relentless. He makes it a daily pursuit to be great. He coaches with great attention to detail to get the best out of his players each and every day.”

–Dabo Swinney

Mickey Conn

Safeties

  • He became a full-time assistant coach (safeties) in January 2017.
  • Produced a second-team All-ACC honoree in Tanner Muse and an honorable mention selection in K’Von Wallace as Clemson’s 15-0 national championship squad led the nation in scoring defense (13.1 points per game).
  • His safeties helped Clemson rank fifth in the nation in pass efficiency defense (106.9) in 2017.
  • Served as senior defensive analyst in 2016, helping the Tigers to the program’s second national championship with a victory over his alma mater, Alabama.
  • Contributed to a Clemson defense that finished tied for first in the nation in fewest passing yards allowed per attempt (5.6) and fourth in passing efficiency defense (100.2). Clemson was also sixth in interceptions (20) and eighth in total defense (311.5).
  • Came to Clemson after 16 seasons as head coach at Grayson (Ga.) High School. The Rams were 137-48 during that time with seven region championships, a state championship in 2011 and a state semifinal playoff appearance in 2015.
  • Grayson High School finished in the top 25 in the nation four times, including No. 3 in 2011. The program reached the No. 1 ranking in the nation twice during his tenure.
  • Began his coaching career at Grayson High School on March 21, 2000, and started his career at Clemson on March 21, 2016.
  • He owned the most wins at the highest classification in the state of Georgia before he came to Clemson and was later inducted into the Gwinnett County (Ga.) Sports Hall of Fame in 2019.
  • Coached several current college and NFL players at Grayson High School, including two-time All-ACC running back Wayne Gallman, the No. 5 rusher in Clemson history. He also coached former Clemson starting cornerback Ryan Carter and former backup quarterback Nick Schuessler.
  • Tiger quarterback Chase Brice is Conn’s nephew.
  • Coached at his alma mater, South Gwinnett High School in Atlanta, in 1998 and 1999. David Greene, who went on to play four years as a starter at Georgia, was his quarterback.
  • Former graduate assistant coach at Alabama in 1996 and 1997. He was on staff when Dabo Swinney was a full-time coach with the Crimson Tide. Alabama was 10-3 and went to the Outback Bowl in 1996 with Conn and Swinney on staff.
  • College teammate of Swinney at Alabama, as they were both on 1992 national championship team under head coach Gene Stallings. Conn lettered during the 1992, 1993 and 1994 seasons, but was on the team from 1990-94. He redshirted his freshman year.
  • Earned a bachelor’s degree from Alabama in 1995.
  • Earned a masters degree from Ball State in 2006.

Todd Bates

Defensive Tackles

  • Joined the Clemson staff as defensive line coach in January 2017.
  • For 2017, became the first Clemson coach to mentor all four defensive line positions since Ron West in 2004, and just the second to do it since 1998.
  • Coached one of the nation’s best defensive lines in 2017 and 2018, including Austin Bryant, Clelin Ferrell, Dexter Lawrence and Christian Wilkins. All four earned either All-America or first-team All-ACC honors under Bates’ guidance.
  • Helped Wilkins collect Outland, Nagurski, Bednarik and Lott IMPACT finalist selections in 2018 in addition to winning the William V. Campbell Trophy. Also guided Wilkins as he became the fifth unanimous All-American in Clemson history.
  • Placed both of his starters at defensive tackle (Wilkins and Lawrence) on the first-team All-ACC list in 2018 after the duo helped Clemson lead the nation in sacks (54) and scoring defense (13.1 points per game) and tie for the national lead in tackles for loss (136).
    • A big reason the 2017 Tigers were second in the nation in scoring defense (13.6) and fourth in total defense (276.7).
  • Helped Jacksonville State to a 33-6 record in three seasons (2014-16). The Gamecocks reached the FCS National Championship Game in 2015 and compiled a perfect 23-0 mark in the Ohio Valley Conference with three titles in his time there.
  • Helped the 2016 Jacksonville State team to a 10-2 record and No. 6 final FCS ranking. That team was fourth in the nation in total defense, allowing just 275 yards per game.
  • In 2014, Jacksonville State allowed a league-best 128 yards per game on the ground.
  • Began his coaching career at Talladega High School in Alabama in 2007, then spent 2008-11 at Oxford High School in Alabama.
  • Spent time as an assistant coach at Idaho State in 2011 and 2012, then at East Central Junior College in Mississippi in 2013.
  • Earned three letters at Alabama as a defensive end from 2001-04. He was a permanent co-captain in 2004.
  • Alabama went to two bowl games in his career, as a freshman when it beat Iowa State in the Independence Bowl and Music City Bowl his senior year.
  • Alabama was 10-3 and No. 11 in the final AP poll in 2002, Bates’ sophomore season.
  • Played defensive end for the Tennessee Titans in 2005 and 2006.

Mike Reed

Cornerbacks

  • In six years on staff, he has helped the Tigers to a 76-9 record and three appearances in the national championship game, winning national titles in 2016 and 2018.
  • Placed both 2018 starting corners on the All-ACC team, including Trayvon Mullen’s second-team selection and A.J. Terrell’s third-team nod.
  • Helped Mullen and Terrell play major roles in Clemson’s 44-16 National Championship Game win. Terrell opened the scoring on a pick-six, and Mullen earned Defensive MVP honors with six tackles, an interception, a sack and a forced fumble.
  • Contributed to Clemson’s 2018 defense leading the nation in scoring defense (13.1 points per game) for the first time in school history.
  • His cornerbacks helped Clemson rank fifth in the nation in pass efficiency defense (106.9) in 2017.
  • Coached two first-team All-ACC defensive backs in Jadar Johnson and Cordrea Tankersley in 2016.
  • His defensive backs contributed to the 2015 Tigers ranking fourth in the nation in third-down conversion percentage defense.
  • Coached first-team All-ACC cornerback Mackensie Alexander, second-team All-ACC safety Jayron Kearse and third-team All-ACC cornerback Cordrea Tankersley in 2015 en route to being named FootballScoop Defensive Backs Coach of the Year.
  • Helped the 2014 squad lead the nation in total defense (260.8), while also ranking in the top five in many other statistical categories. Coached first-team All-ACC cornerback Garry Peters that season.
  • His defensive backs combined for 15 interceptions in 2013. Bashaud Breeland, who had a team-tying-high four interceptions and 74 tackles, was a second-team All-ACC selection and a fourth-round draft pick.
  • His defensive backs helped Clemson finish 10th in the nation in turnovers forced (30) in 2013.
  • Was the defensive backs coach at NC State for six seasons (2007-12).
  • Has been an assistant coach at the college level for 14 years and at the NFL level for five seasons. He coached NC State All-American David Amerson, who ranked third in ACC history in career interceptions (18). As a professional coach with the Philadelphia Eagles, he worked with former Clemson All-American and nine-time Pro Bowl selection Brian Dawkins.
  • Helped the Wolfpack to four bowl games in his six years with the program. That includes 2012, when NC State beat a top-five Florida State team and played Vanderbilt in the Music City Bowl.
  • Three times in his last five years in Raleigh, NC State finished in the top 20 in the nation in interceptions.
  • The 2011 NC State squad had 27 interceptions, the most by an FBS school since 2003, when Nebraska had 32. The total tied for second-most in ACC history and the most since 1994, when Virginia had 27 interceptions.
  • In 2011, Amerson had 13 interceptions to lead the nation, five more than any other player. It tied for the third-most interceptions in NCAA history. Amerson also led the nation in interception return yards (205) and tied for the lead in interception returns for touchdown (2). Amerson was a unanimous All-American in 2011, when he was also a Thorpe Award finalist and won the Jack Tatum Award.
  • In addition to Amerson, Reed also coached four different all-conference players at NC State across six seasons.
  • Played on three bowl teams that finished with top-25 AP rankings, including the 1993 season when Boston College upset top-ranked Notre Dame in South Bend.
  • Played three seasons for Tom Coughlin, who has gone on to win two Super Bowl Championships with the New York Giants, and his senior year for Dan Henning, who also went on to coach in the NFL.
  • Was the last selection of the 1995 NFL Draft by the Carolina Panthers and played two seasons (1995,96) for that team, including the 1995 team that played its home games at Memorial Stadium. He also played for the NFL Europe team in Frankfurt and was team captain of the 1999 team that won the World Bowl Championship.

“Mike brings great energy to Clemson. He is a great teacher at his position and loves his players deeply. He has made a great impact within our program in his first full season with us.”

–Dabo Swinney

Lemanski Hall

Defensive Ends

  • In 2018, Hall moved into one of the now 10 full-time coaching positions as defensive ends coach.
  • In his first season as an assistant coach in 2018, he helped Clemson win a national title and set a school record with 54 sacks, the third-most by any FBS team since 2000. The unit led the nation in sacks and tied for the national lead in tackles for loss (136).
  • Helped Clelin Ferrell win the Ted Hendricks Award and ACC Defensive Player of the Year while earning consensus All-America status in 2018,.Fellow starter Austin Bryant took home third-team All-ACC and Cotton Bowl Most Outstanding Player honors.
  • Served as a defensive analyst in 2015 and 2016 and as a senior defensive analyst in 2017, helping the Tigers to a 40-4 record, three ACC championships and three College Football Playoff berths in those three seasons. All four years he has been at Clemson, the Tigers have faced Alabama, his alma mater, in the postseason. Clemson faced Alabama just once in the 40 years prior to his arrival at Clemson.
  • Clemson has finished in the top four of the AP and coaches polls in each of his four seasons, the only time in Clemson history it has had four-straight, top-four finishes. Clemson has ranked in the top four of all 24 College Football Playoff polls since 2015.
  • Hall’s relationship with head coach Dabo Swinney dates to their college careers at Alabama. Both were members of the 1992 national championship team. Hall earned first-team All-SEC honors in 1992 and was a UPI Honorable Mention All-American. He was captain of Alabama’s 1993 team and was named to the Alabama All-Decade team for the 1990s.
  • The Alabama native led the 1992 Crimson Tide national championship team in tackles (70), including eight tackles for loss and five sacks. He added 76 tackles as a senior in 1993. He was named first-team All-SEC by the coaches in both seasons.
  • Alabama had a 40-9-1 record in his four years and played four bowl games. The Crimson Tide won three of those bowl games, including a 34-13 win over Miami (Fla.) in the Sugar Bowl at the end of the 1992 season that gave Alabama the national title.
  • Hall was drafted by the Houston Oilers and played in the NFL for nine years and 101 games from 1994-02. His top year came in 2001 when he had 62 tackles for the Vikings, tied for fifth on the team. He started 13 games and played all 16 games that year, helping the Vikings to the second round of the playoffs.
  • Upon his retirement as a player, Hall first was a volunteer coach at Centennial High School in Franklin, Tenn. He then did an internship with the Tennessee Titans through the NFL Diversity Coaching Fellowship. In this role, he observed NFL coaches and worked with them to evaluate players.
  • He worked as a recruiting coordinator and pro performance director at D1 Sports Training & Therapy. He coached football and served as the strength & conditioning coach at Christ Presbyterian Academy before moving on to his career at The Ensworth School.
  • Hall came to Clemson prior to the 2015 season after seven years as linebackers coach and fitness instructor at The Ensworth School.
  • Hall attended Valley (Ala.) High School, where he played quarterback and defensive back. As a senior, he totaled 1,110 rushing yards and 20 touchdowns. He also had 20 interceptions on the way to winning all-state honors.

Support Staff

Alex Bina Alex Bina

Director of Applied Science

TY CLEMENTS TY CLEMENTS

Director of On-Campus Recruiting

MIKE DOOLEY MIKE DOOLEY

DIRECTOR OF FOOTBALL OPERATIONS AND PLAYER PERSONNEL

Wes Goodwin Wes Goodwin

Senior Defensive Assistant

D.J. GORDON D.J. GORDON

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FOOTBALL OPERATIONS AND CREATIVE MEDIA

TODD GREEN TODD GREEN

Director of Football Video Operations

HENRY GUESS HENRY GUESS

Director of Football Coaching Video

WOODY MCCORVEY WOODY MCCORVEY

ASSOCIATE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR OF FOOTBALL ADMINISTRATION

Jayse McQuaig Jayse McQuaig

Assistant Director for Football Technology

KYLE RICHARDSON KYLE RICHARDSON

SENIOR OFFENSIVE ASSISTANT

ABE REED ABE REED

DIRECTOR OF EQUIPMENT

Joe Robbins Joe Robbins

Director of Recruiting Graphic Design

Bill Spiers Bill Spiers

Senior Assistant for Offense and Special Teams

JORDAN SORRELLS JORDAN SORRELLS

Director of Recruiting Operations

BRAD SCOTT BRAD SCOTT

ASSISTANT ATHLETIC DIRECTOR OF FOOTBALL PLAYER DEVELOPMENT

Tracy Swinney Tracy Swinney

Director of Football Security

THAD TURNIPSEED THAD TURNIPSEED

DIRECTOR OF RECRUITING & EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

Maddie Williams Maddie Williams

Creative Media Coordinator

NICK YARID NICK YARID

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF EQUIPMENT

Administrative Support Staff

JENNIFER BENTON JENNIFER BENTON

ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR OF FOOTBALL OPERATIONS

BETH DOUGLAS BETH DOUGLAS

ASSISTANT TO THE HEAD COACH

Lindsey Morris Lindsey Morris

Administrative Assistant Recruiting

ASHLEY SPIERS ASHLEY SPIERS

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT HEAD COACH

JILL WILLIAMS-WILKS JILL WILLIAMS-WILKS

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT PLAYER DEVELOPMENT

REN WINDHAM REN WINDHAM

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT OFFENSE

Player Development

CAM AIKEN CAM AIKEN

ASSISTANT FOR OFFENSIVE PLAYER DEVELOPMENT

MIGUEL CHAVIS MIGUEL CHAVIS

ASSISTANT FOR DEFENSIVE PLAYER DEVELOPMENT

TYLER GRISHAM TYLER GRISHAM

ASSISTANT FOR OFFENSIVE ANALYSIS & RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

BRANDON MCCOMBS BRANDON MCCOMBS

ASSISTANT FOR SPECIAL TEAMS ANALYSIS & RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

DEANDRE MCDANIEL DEANDRE MCDANIEL

Assistant for Defensive Analysis

Graduate Assistants

Daniel Boyd Daniel Boyd

Graduate Assistant

Xavier Brewer Xavier Brewer

Graduate Assistant

ZACH FULMER ZACH FULMER

Graduate Assistant

Roderick McDowell Roderick McDowell

Graduate Assistant

Maverick Morris Maverick Morris

Graduate Assistant

Chansi Stuckey Chansi Stuckey

Graduate Assistant

Strength and Conditioning

JOEY BATSON JOEY BATSON

DIRECTOR OF FOOTBALL STRENGTH & CONDITIONING

Adrien Dunn Adrien Dunn

Strength and Conditioning Graduate Assistant

LARRY GREENLEE LARRY GREENLEE

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FOOTBALL STRENGTH & CONDITIONING

PAUL HOGAN PAUL HOGAN

FOOTBALL SENIOR ASSISTANT STRENGTH & CONDITIONING COACH

ADAM SMOTHERMAN ADAM SMOTHERMAN

FOOTBALL ASSISTANT STRENGTH & CONDITIONING COACH

P.A.W. Journey

SAVANNAH BAILEY SAVANNAH BAILEY

Director of Life Skills & Community Service

Travis Blanks Travis Blanks

DIRECTOR OF FORMER PLAYER ENGAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

JEFF DAVIS JEFF DAVIS

ASSISTANT ATHLETIC DIRECTOR OF FOOTBALL PLAYER RELATIONS

Rashard Hall Rashard Hall

Director of Career & Professional Development

Reggie Pleasant Reggie Pleasant

LIFE COACH

Performance Nutrition

Hali Foreman Hali Foreman

Executive Performance Chef

PAUL HARRINGTON PAUL HARRINGTON

Director of Football Performance Nutrition

Niki Lyon Niki Lyon

Nutrition Operations Coordinator

Sports Medicine

Dr. Larry Bowman Dr. Larry Bowman

Physician

Scott Crothers Scott Crothers

Assistant Athletic Trainer-Football

Dr. Milt Lowder Dr. Milt Lowder

Sports Psychologist

Dr. Steven Martin Dr. Steven Martin

Physician

Danny Poole Danny Poole

Director of Sports Medicine/Head Athletic Trainer

Dr. Len Reeves Dr. Len Reeves

Physician

Cheyenne Reynolds Cheyenne Reynolds

Assistant Athletic Trainer-Football